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Surveillance of injuries among Kenya Rugby Union (KRU) players — Season 2010

 

Authors: Muma N1  MBChB, MMed, Saidi H2 MBChB, MMed, FACS, Githaiga3 JW MBChB, MMed

Affiliation: 1- Kijabe Hospital, Kenya 2- Department Human Anatomy, University of Nairobi 3- Department of Surgery, University of

Nairobi. Correspondence: Dr. Muma Nyagetuba; Kijabe Hospital, Kenya Email

 

Abstract

Objective: To determine the incidence and characteristics of injury amongst Kenya rugby union players and associated factors.

Design: A whole population prospective cohort study.

Methods: 364 registered Kenya rugby union (KRU) players were stud-ied throughout the 2010 season. Data on their demographics, injury incidence, pattern and severity were gathered. The study tool used was the Rugby International Consensus Group (RICG) Statement.

 

Results: There were 173 backs and 191 forwards. One hundred and two 1 injuries for 60 league games (2400match player hours) were recorded. The incidence of injuries was 42.5/1000 match player hours   (mph), (44.2 for forwards and 40.8 for backs). Lower limb injuries were the most common (41.2%) . Players were most prone to injuries in the in tackle scenario (63.7%), at the beginning of the season (47.1%), and in the last quarter (50%) of a game.

 

Conclusion: The injury incidence recorded contrast the earlier Kenyan data but is comparable to international amateur level incidence, uniqueness of the Kenyan environment notwithstanding. The higher rates associated with the tackle/tackled scenario, earlier part of the season and later part of the game, suggest interventions can target player conditioning, and use of protective gear.

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