The Pattern and Outcome of Chest Injuries in South West Nigeria

 

 Author: Ogunrombi A.B. 1 FWACS, MSc(Med)CTS, Onakpoya1 U.U. FWACS, Ekrikpo U.2 MBBS, MSc(Med), Adesunkanmi

A.K. 1 FWACS, FICS, Adejare I.E. 1 MBBS Affiliations: 1 - Department of Surgery, College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife 2- Department of Medicine, University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Uyo, Nigeria Correspondence: Akinwumi B. Ogunrombi Department of Surgery, College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, 220005, Nigeria. +2348062279218 Email-

 

Abstract

Objective: The pattern and management outcome of chest injuries presenting to our tertiary university hospital located in a semi-urban population in the South West of Nigeria, has not been documented previously. We therefore sought to identify factors that may contribute to mortality.

 

Method: We analyzed 114 patients presenting to the Accident and Emergency Unit with chest trauma, prospectively entered into a data base over a two year period.

 

Results: Chest trauma accounted for 6% of all trauma admissions with a male preponderance (M:F = 3.6:1). Rib fractures were the most common injury (46.3%) while limb fractures were the most common associated injury (35.8%). Associated head injury accounted for most  deaths (56%) in those with severe ISS. Majority of patients (51.8%) required only analgesics, while additional closed tube thoracostomy drainage was necessary (41.8%) in the others who suffered blunt trauma. Thoracotomy was indicated for only 5 (4.5%) penetrating injuries. There is a rising trend towards penetrating gunshot injuries, with mortality increasing with age (p=0.03) and severity of associated injuries (ISS) (p=0.003).

 

Conclusion: Majority of the patients required only minimal interven-tion with chest drainage or analgesics, with low mortality. Increasing age and severity of injury contributed significantly to mortality. Initia-tion of care for chest trauma victims is still delayed in our centre.

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The Annals of African Surgery is the official publication of the Surgical Society of Kenya.

 

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