Utility of the Bidirectional Glenn Shunt

Mark Nelson Awori, Mohammed Nabil Khan Mohamed, Ali Ahmed Mohamed

School of Medicine, University of Nairobi

Correspondence to: Dr. Mark Awori, PO Box 14677–00800 Nairobi, Kenya; email: mnawori@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background: Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a significant cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. Bi-directional Glenn Shunts (BDGS) form part of the surgical strategy used to treat CHD; no data exists on BDGS usage in the study locality. Methods: A 7-year retrospective, descriptive study was carried out at the Kenyatta National Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2012. Results: Eleven BDGS were performed on 11 patients; 63.6% had tricuspid atresia, 27.3% had double outlet right ventricle and 9.1% had pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum.

Conclusion: Further studies are warranted to identify factors contributing to the late performance of BDGS, poor post-operative follow-up and failure to perform FC.

Key words: Cavopulmonary, Glenn, Shunt, Bidirectional Ann Afr Surg. 2019; 16 (1):30–32

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/aas.v16il.7

Conflicts of Interest: None

Funding: None

@2019 Author. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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