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The Annals of African Surgery is the official publication of the Surgical Society of Kenya.

 

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ISSN (print): 1999-9674; ISSN (online): 2523-0816

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Topography of The Posterior Communicating Artery in a Kenyan Population

Author Information

Sinkeet S (BSc. Anatomy), Ogeng’o J (BSc. Anatomy, MBChB, PhD), Saidi H (BSc. Anatomy, MBChB, MMed (Surg), FCS,(ESCA), FACS, Awori K (MBChB, MMed (Surg), Dip (SICOT), FCS (Orth) ECSA), Affiliation: Department of Human Anatomy, University of Nairobi.

Corresponding author:

Simeon Sinkeet, P.O Box 30197-00100, Nairobi. E-mail: komoisi@yahoo.com

Abstract

Background: Configuration and branching pattern of the posterior communicating artery influence occurrence and approaches to management of aneurysms. Distribution of the various configurations and branching patterns shows population variations but reports from Africa are scanty.

Objective: To determine the prevalence of various configurations and branching pattern of the posterior communicating artery in a Kenyan population.

Materials and Methods: Eighty four posterior communicating arteries obtained from Department of Human Anatomy were studied. The configuration and number of branches in each third and length of the longest perforator free zone of the posterior communicating artery were evaluated

Results: Adult configuration was observed in 56%, hypoplastic in 25%, fetal in 12% and transitional in 7%. Mean number of branches given off was 7.2 ± 1.9 (range: 3-12), highest in proximal and lowest in the distal third of the artery. Perforator free zone ranged between 1mm to 8mm with a mean of 4.01 ± 1.54mm and was longest in the hypoplastic configuration.

Conclusion: Configurations observed in the Kenyan population are comparable to those reported in the Caucasian populations. From an anatomical standpoint, the two are equally predisposed to development of aneurysms. Posterior third of PComA had the least number of branches suggesting that the pterional approach to basilar tip aneurysm among Kenyans may be a safer procedure.

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