Upper Limb Congenital Anomalies in Nigeria

David O. Odatuwa-Omagbemi1, Emeka Izuagba2, Roy E. T. Enemudo1, Taiwo O. Osisanya3, Cletus I. Otene1

Lukman O. Ajiboye4

1-Department of Surgery, Delta State University, Abraka. Nigeria.

2-Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, National Orthopaedic Hospital, Lagos. Nigeria.

3-Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, National Orthopaedic Hospital, Lagos. Nigeria.

4-Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Usman Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto. Nigeria.

 

Correspondence to:

Dr. David O. Odatuwa-Omagbemi, Department of Surgery, Delta State University, Abraka. Nigeria.

E-mail: odatuwa@live.com

Tel.: +2348037156848.

Abstract

Background: About 1 - 2% of neonates have congenital anomalies of which 10% affect the upper limbs. Congenital anomalies are structural or metabolic defects present at birth.

Objective: To review cases seen over a four-year period in a tertiary specialist hospital in Lagos, and share our experience.

Methodology: Case notes and theatre records of patients with congenital upper limb anomalies seen during a 4-year period were retrieved and relevant data extracted. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 20.

Results: There were 46 patients with 53 diagnoses of upper extremity congenital anomalies. There were 28 males and 18 females (M: F approx. = 1.6:1). Ages at presentation ranged from 5 weeks to 14 years. Seventeen patients (37%) presented within the first 12 months of life. Average ages of mothers and fathers were 34.1 and 37 years respectively. Twenty-six per cent and 28.3 % of mothers had febrile illnesses and used herbal products respectively during the index pregnancies. Swanson’s group 2 was the commonest (58.4). Syndactyly was the commonest descriptive individual diagnosis (49%). Treatments were individualized according to specific diagnosis.

Conclusions: Congenital anomalies of the upper extremities present as various diagnostic entities. Syndactyly was the most frequently encountered here.

 

Key Words: Upper limbs, Congenital, Anomalies.

Ann Afr Surg. ****; **(*):***

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/aas.v17i2.7

Conflicts of Interest: None

Funding: None

© 2020 Author. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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